Top 10 Highest Paying Tech Jobs Without Coding 2024

Mark Talmage-Rostron
May 24, 2024 · 17 min read

The field of technology offers a wide range of lucrative career opportunities. With the rapid advancements in tech, the demand for skilled professionals in this domain is on the rise.

In this article, we will explore the top 10 highest paying non-coding tech jobs and salaries, based on recent data and industry trends.

You can't move these days without hearing words like digital transformation, artificial intelligence, machine learning, blockchain, business analytics, and much more. Forbes says that tech is exploding with more vigor than ever before. with so many innovations and breakthroughs happening right now. Computing power is increasing, there are amazing smart devices hitting the market and they are getting smarter. And let's not forget 3D printing which many people still can't wrap their heads around.

If the Industry is growing in leaps and bounds, then it stands to reason that the demand for people to fill jobs within the tech industry is also increasing. So you can really build a long and lucrative tech career in your choice of tech field. And, many of them, surprisingly, don't require coding or [programming skills as a minimum to get a foot in the door.

The technology industry is diverse and offers a wide range of career paths that cater to various skill sets and interests. There is project management, technical writing, user experience design, cybersecurity analyst, and data analysis and data science.

That all said, while coding might not be a primary requirement for these roles, having basic coding knowledge can still be beneficial as technology continues to evolve and integrate into various industries. Additionally, the specific requirements for each job can vary depending on the company, industry, and the evolving nature of technology.

Let's discuss the top 10 highest-paying tech jobs without coding in 2024, alongside the skills required and their salaries.

Top 10 Best Paying IT Tech Without Coding 2024 (Inc Salaries)

1. Data Analyst 

A Data Analyst is a professional who specializes in interpreting and analyzing data within the context of the technology industry and is one of top tech jobs that don't require coding. Their primary role involves gathering, organizing, and analyzing large sets of data generated by various technological systems, applications, or devices. Their scope of work often involves working closely with teams across various departments, including IT, software development, marketing, finance, and operations. Hence, they play a crucial role in helping organizations leverage their data assets to gain competitive advantages, improve decision-making, enhance products or services, and identify opportunities for innovation and growth within the tech industry.

Becoming a tech data analyst involves a combination of education, acquiring relevant skills, gaining experience, and staying updated with industry trends, but generally you will require: Obtaining a bachelor’s degree in a field related to data analysis such as Computer Science, Statistics, Mathematics, Economics, Information Technology, or Data Science, learning programming languages commonly used in data analysis like Python, R, SQL, or tools such as SAS, MATLAB, or Excel for data manipulation, statistical analysis, and visualization, familiarizing yourself with data querying languages (SQL) and database management systems (DBMS) to extract, manipulate, and manage data efficiently, developing an understanding data analysis techniques, data cleaning, data visualization, and statistical methods to interpret and derive insights from data sets, or obtaining certifications in data analysis from reputable organizations or platforms (e.g., Microsoft, Google, Coursera, Udacity, edX). That said you will continuously have to update your skillset to remain relevant and employable. 

The average annual salary for a data analyst in the US is $76,834.

2. Software Sales Rep

A software sales representative, often referred to as a software salesperson or sales rep, is a professional responsible for selling software products or solutions to businesses or individual customers and certainly is one of those jobs in tech without coding. Their primary focus is on generating revenue by understanding the software's features, benefits, and how it can address the needs or challenges of potential clients. To excel in this role, strong communication skills, negotiation skills, a good understanding of technology, and the ability to adapt to changing market demands are essential, plus you'll need to be persuasive, results-driven, and customer-focused to successfully sell software solutions in a competitive market.

Becoming a software sales representative involves a blend of education, acquiring relevant skills, gaining experience, and cultivating key personal traits, but generally you will require: A bachelor's degree in Business Administration, Marketing, Computer Science, or a related field, familiarizing yourself with the software industry, different types of software products, their functionalities, and their applications in various industries, practicing presenting and explaining complex technical concepts in a simple and understandable manner, considering getting certifications in sales or specific software products. Many software companies offer training programs and certifications for their products, which can enhance your credibility and knowledge in the field. 

The average annual salary for a Software Sales Rep in the US is $101,735.

3. Software Product Manager

A Software Product Manager is a professional responsible for the strategy, development, and overall success of a software product throughout its lifecycle and serves as a bridge between various stakeholders, including customers, development teams, marketing, sales, and leadership, ensuring that the software product aligns with the company's goals and meets the needs of its users. They play a critical role in driving the success and competitiveness of software products in the market by balancing user needs, business goals, and technological capabilities throughout the product lifecycle.

Becoming a software product manager requires a combination of education, acquiring relevant skills, gaining experience, and cultivating key personal traits, but generally you will require: A bachelor’s degree in a related field such as Computer Science, Software Engineering, Business Administration, Marketing, or a field relevant to the software industry, gaining proficiency in technical skills relevant to software development and project management, developing business skills including strategic thinking, market analysis, customer research, and financial literacy, learning about UX/UI design principles and user-centered design methodologies, or learning project management methodologies such as Agile, Scrum, or Kanban, which are commonly used in software development.

The average annual salary for a Software Product Manager in the US is $79,100.

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4. Product Marketing Manager 

A Product Marketing Manager is a professional responsible for the strategic planning, development, and execution of marketing strategies specifically tailored for technology products or services, and it is one of the well-paying tech jobs that don't require programming skills. They bridge the gap between the technical aspects of a product and its market positioning, aiming to drive awareness, demand, and successful adoption of the technology among target customers. To taste success, they have to continuously adapt to changing market dynamics, leverage innovative marketing approaches, and collaborate cross-functionally with product, sales, and other teams to ensure the success of technology products in the market.

Becoming a tech product marketing manager involves a combination of education, acquiring relevant skills, gaining experience, and cultivating key personal traits but generally you will require: A bachelor’s degree in a related field such as Marketing, Business Administration, Communications, or a field relevant to the technology industry, gaining foundational marketing skills including market research, consumer behavior analysis, brand management, and strategic marketing planning, developing a deep understanding of technology products, their features, functionalities, and how they solve customer problems, acquiring skills in data analysis and interpretation to understand marketing metrics, customer behavior, and campaign performance, or understanding sales processes, customer relationship management (CRM), and sales enablement. 

The average annual salary for a Product Marketing Manager in the US is $141,523.

5. Tech Project Manager 

A tech project manager, also known as a technical project manager, is a professional responsible for overseeing and managing technology-related projects within an organization and they don't require coding skills. The job role does require management skills, organizational skills and interpersonal skills. A tech project manager's primary focus is on planning, executing, and delivering projects related to the development, implementation, or maintenance of technology solutions or systems. They often work in technology-driven industries, including software development, IT infrastructure, hardware implementation, and digital transformation initiatives, managing projects ranging from software deployments to system integrations and technology upgrades. 

Becoming a tech project manager involves a combination of education, acquiring relevant skills, gaining experience, and cultivating key personal traits, but generally you will require: A bachelor’s degree in a related field such as Computer Science, Information Technology, Engineering, Business Administration, or Project Management, acquiring knowledge of project management methodologies such as Agile, Scrum, Waterfall, or PRINCE2 and familiarizing yourself with project management tools like Jira, Asana, Microsoft Project, or Trello, developing a solid understanding of technology, IT infrastructure, software development lifecycle, or other technical domains relevant to the projects you wish to manage, or considering obtaining certifications in project management such as Project Management Professional (PMP), Certified Associate in Project Management (CAPM), PRINCE2, Agile Certified Practitioner (ACP), or Certified ScrumMaster (CSM). 

The average annual salary for a Project Manager in the US is $103,945.

6. Systems Administrator 

A systems administrator, often referred to as a sysadmin, is a professional responsible for the maintenance, configuration, installation, and reliable operation of an organization's computer systems and networks. They play a critical role in ensuring the efficient performance and security of an organization's IT infrastructure. Sysadmins work in various industries and organizations, ranging from small businesses to large enterprises, government agencies, educational institutions, and more, and collaborate with IT teams, network engineers, software developers, and other professionals to maintain a reliable and secure IT environment that supports the organization's operations.

Becoming a Systems Administrator involves a combination of education, acquiring technical skills, gaining experience, and staying updated with relevant technologies, but generally you will require: A bachelor’s degree in a related field such as Computer Science, Information Technology, Computer Engineering, or a discipline that provides a foundation in IT systems and networks, gaining proficiency in operating systems such as Windows Server, Linux, Unix, or other relevant platforms, acquiring knowledge of network fundamentals including TCP/IP, DNS, DHCP, VPNs, routing, and network security, or considering obtaining certifications relevant to system administration such as CompTIA A+, CompTIA Network+, CompTIA Security+, Microsoft Certified: Azure Administrator Associate, Microsoft Certified: Azure Solutions Architect Expert, Red Hat Certified System Administrator (RHCSA), or certifications specific to the systems you wish to administer. 

The average annual salary for a Systems Administrator in the US is $82,845.

7. UX/UI Designer 

UX (User Experience) design and UI (User Interface) design are two distinct but closely related aspects of the design process that are often handled by the same person or team. They work in various industries, including tech companies, design agencies, startups, and large corporations, contributing to the creation of websites, mobile apps, software interfaces, and other digital products, and their goal is to create designs that not only look visually appealing but also provide a seamless and enjoyable user experience. 

Becoming a UX/UI designer involves a combination of education, acquiring relevant skills, gaining experience, and building a portfolio to showcase your work, generally you will require: Obtaining a formal education in design, interaction design, graphic design, human-computer interaction, or a related field, gaining a solid understanding of UX/UI design principles, methodologies, and processes, familiarizing yourself with user research techniques, wireframing, prototyping, information architecture, and usability testing, becoming proficient in design tools and software commonly used in UX/UI design such as Sketch, Adobe XD, Figma, InVision, Axure RP, or other relevant software, or enhancing your visual design skills, including layout design, typography, color theory, and iconography. 

The average annual salary for a UX/UI Designer in the US is $86,966

8. Technical Writer 

A technical writer is a professional who specializes in creating written content that communicates technical and complex information in a clear, concise, and easily understandable manner. Their primary role is to transform complex technical concepts, instructions, procedures, or specifications into user-friendly documentation that can be easily comprehended by a target audience, and are employed in various industries including software development, IT, engineering, healthcare, manufacturing, and many others where complex technical information needs to be communicated effectively to users, clients, or stakeholders.

Becoming a technical writer involves a blend of education, acquiring relevant skills, gaining experience, and building a portfolio to showcase your writing abilities, but generally you will require: A bachelor’s degree in a relevant field such as English, Technical Communication, Journalism, Communications, or a discipline related to the industry you wish to work in (e.g., Computer Science for tech writing), acquiring proficiency in documentation tools commonly used by technical writers, such as Microsoft Word, Adobe FrameMaker, MadCap Flare, RoboHelp, or other relevant software, familiarizing yourself with industry-specific style guides (e.g., Microsoft Manual of Style for technical documentation, Chicago Manual of Style, APA) and documentation standards to ensure consistency and adherence to guidelines, or considering taking courses, workshops, or online training programs focused on technical writing, document design, information architecture, or related skills. 

The average annual salary for a Technical Writer in the US is $81,780.

9. Business Analyst 

A Business Analyst (BA) is a professional who acts as a bridge between business stakeholders and technical teams, helping organizations improve their processes, systems, and operations by analyzing business needs, identifying problems, and proposing solutions. They play a crucial role in facilitating communication, understanding business requirements, and ensuring that technology solutions align with business objectives, and work in various industries such as finance, healthcare, IT, retail, or consulting firms, where they contribute to projects related to system implementations, process improvements, software development, or business transformations.

Becoming a BA involves a combination of education, acquiring relevant skills, gaining experience, and developing key competencies in business analysis, but typically you will need: A bachelor’s degree in a relevant field such as Business Administration, Management, Finance, Economics, Information Technology, Computer Science, or a related discipline, honing your analytical skills to evaluate information, identify problems, and propose solutions, acquiring knowledge of business analysis methodologies, tools, and techniques such as SWOT analysis, process modeling (like BPMN or UML), requirements elicitation, stakeholder management, and use of tools like Microsoft Visio, JIRA, or IBM Rational, or considering pursuing certifications to enhance your credibility and demonstrate your expertise in business analysis. Certifications such as Certified Business Analysis Professional (CBAP), Entry Certificate in Business Analysis (ECBA), or Agile Analysis Certification (IIBA-AAC) are recognized in the industry.

The average annual salary for a Business Analyst in the US is $93,074.

10. Content Marketing Manager 

A Technology Content Marketing Manager is a professional responsible for creating and managing content marketing strategies specifically focused on technology products, services, or solutions. It is one of the entry-level tech jobs and the role involves developing and implementing content plans that resonate with the target audience, drive engagement, and support the marketing goals of a technology-based company. Successful Technology Content Marketing Managers are adept at creating content that educates, engages, and influences the target audience while driving brand awareness, thought leadership, and ultimately, supporting the company's growth objectives in the technology sector.

Becoming a Technology Content Marketing Manager involves a combination of education, acquiring relevant skills, gaining experience, and demonstrating expertise in content marketing within the technology sector, but generally you will require: A bachelor’s degree in Marketing, Communications, Journalism, English, Business, or a related field, honing your content creation skills by writing and producing various types of content such as blog posts, articles, case studies, eBooks, infographics, videos, and more, familiarizing yourself with content marketing strategies, principles, and best practices, acquiring a strong understanding of technology products, services, trends, and industry-specific terminology, or learning digital marketing concepts and tools, including SEO, social media marketing, email marketing, content management systems (CMS), analytics tools, and marketing automation platforms. 

The average annual salary for a Content Marketing Manager in the US is $77,539.


Conclusion 

Many people believe that you can't get a tech job without coding skills but that is simply not true. You can secure high-paying tech jobs without a primary focus on coding. The technology industry offers various non-coding roles that are highly valued and can yield substantial compensation based on specialized skills, expertise, experience, and contributions in specific domains. You could become a Product Manager, Project Manager, IT Service Manager, Digital Marketing Manager, Chief Information Security Officer, or Vice President of Sales. 

If you are looking to start what can promise to be a lucrative job as someone who has no tech coding experience, there are many ways to get there. To land one of the highest paying tech jobs without programming skills it would be best to consider on the job training, gaining certificates, or obtaining either a BBA or an MBA degree from an internationally- recognized university such as Nexford.

To make sure that you get the soft skills and hard skills needed to start and build a lucrative career as a person with no skills in coding, download our free report.


FAQs 

Is Technology a solid career path to choose?

Yes, pursuing jobs in the tech industry without programming knowledge can be a solid and rewarding choice for several reasons. The technology industry continues to experience rapid growth, resulting in a high demand for skilled professionals. Technology roles often offer competitive salaries and benefits. Professionals in this field have the opportunity to work on cutting-edge technologies, explore new innovations, and continuously learn and upskill throughout their careers. Professionals in this field have the opportunity to work on cutting-edge technologies, explore new innovations, and continuously learn and upskill throughout their careers.

The tech industry often allows for remote work opportunities and flexible schedules. Many tech roles can be performed remotely, offering flexibility and work-life balance to professionals. And, tech professionals often have opportunities to work in different countries or for multinational companies, expanding their career prospects worldwide. However, it's important to note that the technology industry can be highly competitive and continuously evolving, so keeping up with new technologies, staying adaptable, and continuously learning are essential for success in this field.

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What skills are needed to become a tech professional?

Becoming a successful tech professional requires a blend of technical expertise, soft skills, and a continuous willingness to learn and adapt in a rapidly evolving field, but generally you will require: Proficiency in programming languages such as Python, Java, JavaScript, C++, Ruby, or others relevant to your field of interest. Knowledge of database systems like SQL, NoSQL, or data querying languages for storing and managing data. Skills in HTML, CSS, and frameworks like React, Angular, or Vue.js for front-end development, as well as back-end technologies like Node.js, Django, Flask, or others.

Familiarity with cloud platforms such as AWS, Azure, or Google Cloud and understanding cloud services like SaaS, PaaS, and IaaS. Understanding security principles, protocols, encryption methods, and tools to protect systems and data. Acquiring skills in data analysis, statistics, machine learning algorithms, and tools like TensorFlow, Scikit-learn, or Pandas for data manipulation and modeling. And, understanding DevOps methodologies, automation tools, and version control systems like Git, Jenkins, Docker, Kubernetes, etc.

How can I gain the skills needed to be an tech expert?

To gain the skills needed to become a tech expert, you will be advised to do one or more of the following: Considering pursuing a formal education through a degree program, online courses, or specialized training in your chosen field of interest. Looking for reputable institutions or online platforms offering courses aligned with your career goals. Utilizing online learning platforms such as Coursera, Udemy, edX, Pluralsight, Codecademy, or Khan Academy, which offer a wide range of courses covering various tech skills.

Obtaining relevant certifications in your chosen field. Seeking internships, co-op programs, or entry-level positions in tech companies or relevant organizations. Practical experience in a professional setting can significantly enhance your skills and provide exposure to real-world scenarios. And, participating in coding challenges, hackathons, or tech competitions which can sharpen your problem-solving skills and provide opportunities to showcase your abilities.

What is the highest paid non-coding job in tech? 

The highest paying non-coding job in tech is that of a Product Marketing Manager who on average can expect to earn $141,523 in the US. They are professionals who are responsible for developing and executing marketing strategies to promote and sell a particular product or service, and their primary focus is on understanding the market, target audience, and competition to effectively position and promote the product in a way that meets the needs and desires of customers.

They are typically involved in extensive market research, product positioning, developing a go-to-market strategy, developing product related content, and monitoring and analyzing key performance indicators (KPIs) to assess the success of marketing campaigns and initiatives.

What is the best paid non-coding tech job without a degree?

In the tech industry, there are high-paying roles that might not require a traditional four-year degree but demand specialized skills, certifications, or extensive experience. That said, the best paid non-coding tech job without a degree is that of a Data Analyst who can expect to earn an average salary of $108,660.

As described before, a Data Analyst is a professional who specializes in interpreting and analyzing data within the context of the technology industry. Their primary role involves gathering, organizing, and analyzing large sets of data generated by various technological systems, applications, or devices. Their scope of work often involves working closely with teams across various departments, including IT, software development, marketing, finance, and operations.

How can I progress my career into a tech role?

Progressing into a tech role involves a combination of acquiring relevant skills, gaining experience, networking, and demonstrating your capabilities, but generally you will require: 

Utilizing online resources, courses, tutorials, and bootcamps to learn the necessary technical skills, focussing on programming languages, tools, platforms, or methodologies relevant to your desired role. Considering obtaining certifications or specialized training programs that are recognized in the industry, building practical projects or contributing to open-source projects can demonstrate your skills and commitment to potential employers, seeking internships, apprenticeships, or entry-level positions in tech companies, startups, or organizations where you can gain hands-on experience, networking with professionals in the tech industry, attend meetups, tech events, and join online communities or forums, or, applying for entry-level positions or roles aligned with your skill set and interests.

Is a career in tech the best option in 2024?

It is possibly a case of how long is a piece of string, but experts maintain that the technology industry has been and continues to be a highly promising and dynamic field with numerous opportunities.

However, whether it's the "best" option depends on individual interests, strengths, career aspirations, and the ever-evolving job market landscape. Ultimately, when considering a career path, it's essential to assess your interests, skills, long-term goals, and the evolving job market trends to determine what aligns best with your aspirations and circumstances. Regularly researching industry trends, networking, gaining insights from professionals, and assessing your career trajectory can help in making informed decisions about career choices.

About the author
Mark Talmage-Rostron
Mark Talmage-Rostron

Mark is a college graduate with Honours in Copywriting. He is the Content Marketing Manager at Nexford, creating engaging, thought-provoking, and action-oriented content.

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